Posts Tagged 'music education'



Musical Characteristics and Performance Practice of the Classical Period

By Jacy Burroughs

The Classical period of music had its advent in Italian music of the early eighteenth century and extended into the early nineteenth century. Some musicologists mark the end of the Classical period around 1815, at the end of Beethoven’s compositional middle period. However, the Classical period truly overlaps with both the Baroque and Romantic periods. Characteristics of and performance considerations for Classical period music are outlined below.

Continue reading ‘Musical Characteristics and Performance Practice of the Classical Period’

Ten Interesting Cello Facts

By Jacy Burroughs

Cello_front_side

1. Cello comes from the Italian term violoncello, which actually means “little violone.” (No, I didn’t spell violin wrong.) The violone is the lowest-pitched instrument in the viol family, a group of stringed instruments that were used primarily before the eighteenth century. During the twentieth century, it became customary to abbreviate violoncello as “cello.”

2. The cello is actually part of the violin family, which came into prominent use in the eighteenth century. There are several differences between instruments in the viol family and violin family. Continue reading ‘Ten Interesting Cello Facts’

10 Need-to-Know Facts About the Clarinet

By Carolyn Walter

1. The clarinet has unique acoustics.

Among the canon of typical modern orchestral woodwinds, clarinets are the only reed instruments with cylindrical bores; meaning that the empty space inside the instrument remains the same diameter through the whole length of the tube.  Related reed instruments including saxophones, oboes, English horns and bassoons are all conical-bored; they are  narrow at the top end, widening out to a much larger bell opening.  The sound of a conical instrument, like a sax or bassoon is composed, of both odd and even harmonics, which is why normal fingerings overblow one octave higher for these instruments. As the clarinet is basically a cylindrical pipe closed on only one end (the mouthpiece as it is being played), the wavelength produced changes, and the even-numbered harmonics will not be present in the sound.  This means that lowest notes on your clarinet will overblow at the twelfth – a low E becomes a middle-register B natural when the register key is applied, etc.

2. Each register of the clarinet’s range has its own name.

Continue reading ’10 Need-to-Know Facts About the Clarinet’

A Brief Guide to Baroque Performance Practice

By Jacy Burroughs

The Baroque period is defined as the advent of opera to the death of Bach, which was roughly 1600-1750. Each period of classical music is characterized by its own styles, techniques, and musical characteristics. While most people do not have the option to play on historically accurate instruments, it is still important to work toward historically informed performance by studying the musical style of that time. Several important characteristics of Baroque music are outlined below.

Continue reading ‘A Brief Guide to Baroque Performance Practice’

Ten Facts You Should Know About the (French) Horn

By Jacy Burroughs

1.  Why is it called the French horn? There is some confusion over the correct name of this instrument.   Most non-English speaking countries do not use the nationalistic adjective. Even in France it is simply called cor.  In 1971, the International Horn Society recommended that “horn” be the recognized name for the instrument in the English language. Unfortunately, this hasn’t caught on, especially in the United States. From my experience as a horn player, the instrument is referred to as the French horn throughout primary and secondary education. It was not until college that I learned “horn” was the more accepted term among professionals. The “French” adjective is very misleading because the instrument isn’t even French, which leads me to my second fact.

Continue reading ‘Ten Facts You Should Know About the (French) Horn’

Sheet Music Plus – Randall Faber Interview (Faber Piano Adventures)

PIANO ADVENTURES – RANDALL AND NANCY FABER INTERVIEW

 

In 2013, Sheet Music Plus attended the Music Teacher’s Association of California Convention . After his keynote address and masterclass, we had the opportunity to interview Randall Faber, co-author of the Faber Piano Adventures Series. In the video, Randall provides his expert advice to teachers and answers some questions sent in from members of our Easy Rebates Program for Music Teachers. Please enjoy, you can read a transcript of the interview below:

Continue reading ‘Sheet Music Plus – Randall Faber Interview (Faber Piano Adventures)’

10 Outstanding Resources for Jazz Musicians

By Zachariah Friesen

Teachers, students, professionals and dreamers, welcome to the jazz reference mecca. This is comprised of some of the great literary resources, DVDs and method books for the aspiring jazz musician. Learn the keys of success from people who have success in the profession. With these must-have resources, you’ll be jamming, gigging and living the jazz life in no time.

1. How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker – To play jazz you must learn how to hear jazz. The great Jerry Coker beautifully explains how to train your ear and what to listen for in jazz music.

How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker

How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker

Continue reading ’10 Outstanding Resources for Jazz Musicians’

10 Must-Read Books to Help You Succeed in the Music Industry

By Zachariah Friesen

Whether you or one of your kids is embarking on a journey into the world of music, there is help to guide you along the way. These great resources will give you tips on how the music industry works, how you fit into it and how to survive. Intrigue, information and experience – the learning starts now!

1. The Music Lesson (A Spiritual Search for Growth Through Music) By Victor Wooten

The Music Lesson

The Music Lesson

“…Every movement, phrase, and chord has its own meaning. All you have to do is find the song inside.”

Continue reading ’10 Must-Read Books to Help You Succeed in the Music Industry’

Celebrating Women Composers

By Catherine Hua

When people are asked to name a famous composer off the top of their heads, their answers may vary from Bach and Beethoven to Mozart and Schumann. Yet the composers named often have three qualities in common. They are talented, white, and predominantly male.

So where are the women? Why have none been remembered in the way that Bach and Beethoven are glorified? One factor may be that there were fewer women composers to start with.

In the previous centuries, much female musical talent Continue reading ‘Celebrating Women Composers’

Introduction to the Classical Period

By Catherine Hua

Canaletto

Have you ever read a composer’s name on a music program and realized that you had no clue how to pronounce it, much less know what to expect for his or her music? (Mr. Dvořák, I’m talking about you.) While the pronunciation is simple to learn (it’s DVOR-zhahk by the way), it’s even easier to get a sense of a composer’s style, once you remember the period that he or she is from. If you need a refresher on the Baroque period, you can read more in our previous article here.

Introduction to the Classical Period

The end of the Baroque period took place as a Continue reading ‘Introduction to the Classical Period’


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Thought-provoking articles by musicians for musicians, music lovers or those that want to learn more about it!

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