Posts Tagged 'piano'

12 of the Best New School Choir Arrangements from Shawnee Press

This blog comes courtesy of the Director of Educational Choral Publications for Shawnee Press, Greg Gilpin

Assess! Inspire! Ignite!

As the new school year begins, many teachers are faced with new challenges created by the pandemic as well as ever-changing educational requirements for young people. Here are a few examples:

– You older and experienced singers are not choosing music their junior or senior year because they are taking college courses.

– Your freshman singers missed out on two years of middle school/junior high choir due to the pandemic or lack of a program in your school.

– Your music students have to choose between instrumental and choral. Those that have purchased instruments are most likely to choose band/orchestra. You may have many singers that don’t read music well or at all.

– Because of the pandemic, you find yourself “rebuilding” interest and excitement in your program. Thus, your numbers are low and your choral ensembles are smaller.

Teaching Community and Acceptance!

We Are All the Stars

Greg Gilpin

SATB | SAB | 2-Part | Choir Audio

A reflective and poignant text of how many create one; suitable for all ages. Full harmonic writing with dynamic contrast creates a beautiful interpretation of text. An independent yet supportive piano accompaniment enhances the setting.

Excellent Introduction to Masterworks!

Gloria (from Lord Nelson Mass)

Franz Joseph Haydn (arr. Russell Robinson)

3-Part Mixed 

Accessible voice parts shine in with this Latin text of the Haydn “Gloria.” It’s suitable for concert, contest or festival use with optional solo opportunities. History included on Lord Nelson and Napoleon for additional teaching purposes.

Add Humor and Movement to Your Program!

Earworm

Mark Burrows

2-Part | Choir Audio

The humorous text is relatable to musicians of all ages. Interesting and diverse vocal writing for both parts is supported by a solid piano accompaniment. The creative vocal stack includes an optional descant.

Full of Fun Using Classroom Instruments!

I Want It That Way

Backstreet Boys (arr. Nathan Howe)

SATB | SAB | TTBB | 2-Part 

In 2012, Jimmy Fallon started a recurring segment on “The Tonight Show” in which The Roots use classroom instruments to play pop songs with celebrity guests. These skilled musicians pull off engaging performances using instruments many people don’t take seriously beyond the elementary music room. Nathan Howe has continued his musical genius in a cappella writing with this pop tune sung a cappella with classroom percussion. It’s amazing and fun and suitable for all ages with the variety of voicings available.

Rhythm Teaching for the Holidays!

Hear the Sleigh Bells Ring!

Greg Gilpin

3-Part Treble | 3-Part Mixed | Choir Audio

This original up-tempo holiday selection in a minor key uses independent vocal lines imitating bells then moving into a rhythmic homophonic chorus. Optional descant and sleigh bells add to the joyful lyric of a holiday sleigh ride.

Connecting Our Cultures

Light a Candle On This Silent Night

Glenda E. Franklin

2-Part | 3-Part Mixed | Choir Audio

Poignant message of hope and peace with snippets of “Silent Night” throughout. Limited vocal ranges and simple vocal textures create an ethereal quality; excellent for teaching tone, diction, dynamics, balance and blend.

Great for Beginning A Cappella Ensembles!

Hurry Now to Bethlehem

Ruth Morris Gray

SATB | 3-Part Mixed

A cappella singing is set with optional percussion telling the story of the birth in Bethlehem and creating an exciting Christmas or holiday performance. Optional solos are sprinkled about creating call and answer style moments. The use of multi-meter and repetition make it easy and fun to learn creating an impressive performance.

Superb Patriotic Selection for A Cappella Choirs

God Bless America

Irving Berlin (arr. Mark Hayes)

SATB | SSAB | SSAA | TTBB | Choir Audio

Mark Hayes is one of our finest arrangers and now he has used his expertise in vocal arranging on this Irving Berlin treasure from the American Song Book. A cappella voices richly present the well-known lyric, capturing its emotional patriotism. Beautiful and dynamic musical interpretation weaves throughout the piece, building to a glorious final “home sweet home.”

Beautiful Choice for Multicultural Learning

Akatonbo (Red Dragonfly)

Traditional Japanese Folksong (arr. Greg Gilpin)

2-Part | Choir Audio

The simple text of this famous Japanese children’s song is paired with a beautiful English translation depicting a red dragonfly seen at sunset. The original melody melds with the original partner-song creating gentle vocal lines above a simple and supportive piano accompaniment. 2-part writing that is simply exquisite and the choral includes rehearsal suggestions for added teaching and learning.

Easily Add Sparkle to Your Concert!

Happy Holidays to You!

Mary Lynn Lightfoot

SAB | 2-Part | Choir Audio

Mary Lynn Lightfoot has given us a wonderful concert opener or closer with a message of holiday cheer and a wish that “the joys of the season last the whole year through!” Designed for young voices, the bright and festive original music can be learned quickly with the familiar notes and text of “Deck the Hall” and “Jingle Bells” sprinkled throughout. A sparkling selection for your holiday concert.

Rhythmic Energy!

Little David, Play!

Traditional Spiritual (arr. Brad Croushorn)

SATB | SAB | Choir Audio

Terrific concert, contest or festival piece filled with kinetic musical energy that’s easy to teach and learn with musical respect for the traditional spiritual. The independent part-singing is confidence building, too.

Top Seller with New Voicings!

The Holiday Tango!

Greg Gilpin

SATB | SAB | SSA | TTB | 2-Part | Choir Audio

“The sleigh bells jingle, the shoppers mingle, I get a tingle from watching such a show!” This holiday novelty will be the hit of your concert! The tango-style music set with smart and fun lyrics will create a standout selection for your program. Add some costumes and movement for a real showstopper!

8 Tips On Recruiting For Your Music Program

Due to the coronavirus outbreak, many music institutions were closed. The health commission prohibited many choirs and musicians from performing. Due to health concerns, many parents opted not to enroll their kids in music classes but instead made them attend regular academic classes. One of the noticeable challenges that music teachers faced was recruiting and retaining students.

Thankfully, that’s over. Music educators can now rebuild themselves and create an impact on the students. If you’re an educator yourself, make acute recruitment and retention of students your number one priority. Here are tips to get you started.

1. Introduce Them to Music Materials

Students cannot sign up for your program by themselves or become convinced by the announcements you send to their parents/guardians. You have to expose them to your band, explain the activities, and how they can be successful through your brand.

Host an open house for your classroom. Have current students also attend to meet potential new students and have instruments and music out for potential students to check out.

You can also find opportunities to recruit outside the classroom! Volunteer your current group to perform at community events or have your group travel to younger schools that could feed intro your school to expose them to your program at a younger age.

2. Familiarize Your Students with the Instruments

You must familiarize your students with the instruments, you know music without instruments in nothing. It will take a while to familiarize them with everything, but they’ll appreciate your effort when they get used to them. Once your students know how each tool works, your recruitment program will run smoothly.

3. Make them Fill out Interest Forms

During your first meeting, hand them interest forms. The forms should have space bars for their email address, phone number, the school they attend, and the instruments they would love to play. Doing so will help you get accurate information about your students. This is an essential recruitment stage that will let you know your students.

4. Engage Your Older Students

One of the best ways to hook up your students with music is by giving them a chance to interact with your older students. You can call some of your best students and allow them to teach your young music students some basics. Your juniors will be more comfortable if they interact with senior learners and this will increase retention.

5. Give Them Practical Assignments

After filling out the forms, you should probably know what type of instrument every student love. Take them through different instrumental lessons separately. After every class, make them do some practical presentation of what they have learned. Doing this will help you know how each student is progressing, giving you enough time to figure out what’s next for them.

6. Do Some Follow-Up Activities

To successfully retain your students, you must follow up on their class programs and the assignments you give them. Have a clear understanding of what each student needs. Contact their parents and know how they progress with their projects. Knowing how your music students go will help you establish a good relationship giving you a chance to get new students.

7. Be An Understanding Music Teacher

During your music recruitment program, you will have different students. The ones who are already familiar with the music and those who are new to music. As a music educator, you must understand the students’ two categories. Understanding them will help you provide a quality learning experience.

8. Make It Fun

As a music teacher, you have to be fun around your students. Positively introduce yourself to make them feel comfortable while they are around you. Allow them to participate in the class programs to engage them.

Keep your music classes short and practical so they’re more enjoyable while systematically introducing different musical themes. Make sure you have a positive interaction with your students so they open up and learn better.

Make Your Program Happen

While there might have been some complications in your music program during the last few years, now is the time to make it better and rebuild what you have started. Visit Sheet Music Plus and get the best music selection that can get you in a good mood as you prepare to start teaching music.

Your Intro to Pop A Cappella

Hint: It might just be more approachable than you think!

Looking for new ways to get students to join choir and keep them coming back for more? 

From Pentatonix to Pitch Perfect, they’ve already fallen in love with pop a cappella. 

Here’s Rob Dietz to help you teach them to sing it.

Rob, a cappella teacher/performer/producer with Glee, Sing-Off and America’s Got Talent credits to his name, has put together A Cappella 101, a guide to help you teach students of all levels how to sing the music they love.

Rob also picked out a few songs to help your students apply what they’re learning. This list includes the showstoppers your advanced students are craving and also a strong set to engage those earlier in their journey and help them find success.

A Cappella 101 by Rob Dietz

In A Cappella 101, Rob Dietz expertly describes the nuts, bolts and artistry of creating contemporary a cappella music. Covering everything from pop vocal tone and vocal drumming to movement, arranging and recording, this book and the accompanying online videos are a “how-to” for newbies and seasoned experts alike.

Rob himself introduces the book in this video:

Approachable Pop A Cappella

Viva La Vida

By: Coldplay
Arranged by: Rob Dietz
SAT + Solo and Vocal Percussion

A great starting piece, no basses required! The tenor line is good for both changed and unchanged voices, and the vocal percussion is simple and easy to execute for a beginner.

The Way I Am

By: Ingrid Michaelson
Arranged By: MaryAnne Muglia
SSA

This arrangement features a simple, repeating bass line that’s a great way for altos to get familiar with holding down the bass part of an a cappella arrangement (and it’s not too low!). Lots of simple, well voiced, yet unexpected harmonies in this chart.

Dance Monkey

By: Tones and I
Arranged By: Bryan Sharpe
SAB + Solo and Vocal Percussion

This one is a really good introduction to slightly more complex bass/vocal percussion. The drums are simple, and notated to make them a little easier to pick up for a beginner. The bass sits in a very achievable register for younger voices, and includes some more advanced rhythms without being overwhelming.

When The Party’s Over

By: Billie Eilish
Arranged By: Rob Dietz
SAAB + Solo

Great for groups who want to try some easy, close harmony pop! The ranges are all fairly limited, and parts are mostly stepwise or easy interval jumps. The bass part sits in an easy register for young voices.

Kings and Queens

By: Ava Max
Arranged By: BK Riha
SATB + Vocal Percussion

Lots of block chord singing makes this chart powerful without needing to execute too many dense background textures. The bass and VP are very authentic, but also very easy to pick up quickly (and the VP is notated).

Up for a Bit of a Challenge?

Light In The Hallway
By: Pentatonix
Arranged By: Jacob Narverud
SATBB

Perfect for choirs who want to experiment with a pop sound, as well as beginning a cappella groups who want to do some beautiful close harmony singing. Lots of featured moments for lower voices, so good baris are a plus!

Stitches

By: Shawn Mendes
Arranged By: BK Riha
SATB + Solo and Vocal Percussion

This arrangement is a good introdution to trio-background texture, and features some simple, interwoven lines that will provide a small challenge with a big payoff. Vocal percussion is simple and notated.

Don’t Start Now

By: Dua Lipa
Arranged By: Deke Sharon
SATB + Vocal Percussion

A good step up for groups who want something accessible, but a little more challenging. Some parts are rhythmically more complicated, but repeated, so once you’ve got it, you’ve got it! The lead is shared across all parts, so doesn’t require a soloist.

If I Die Young

By: The Band Perry
Arranged By: Ben Bram
SATB + Solo and Vocal Percussion

A little more ambitious in terms of range and complexity of vocal percussion, but still a very accessible arrangement for a beginner or advanced beginner group. The bridge is a good introduction to singing a bell tone texture.

Aspirational Pop A Cappella

I Need Your Love

By: Ellie Goulding
Arranged By: Ben Bram
SATB div + Solo and Vocal Percussion

For advanced-beginner groups looking for a challenge. More advanced syncopation, bell tone textures, divisi, and intermediate vocal percussion make this arrangement great for leveling up your group.

Shut Up And Dance

By: Walk The Moon
Arranged By: Tom Anderson
SSATTB + Solo and Vocal Percussion

If your group is ready to move to more intermediate contemporary a cappella repertoire, this is a great place to start! Lots of pop syncopations in all parts will force you to find the groove, but a fairly straightforward, four-on-the-floor vocal percussion line will help tie it all together.

Somewhere Only We Know

By: Keane
Arranged By: Katherine Bodor
SSAATBB + Solo and Vocal Percussion

A great introduction to multi-trio, layered harmony. This arrangement allows a group to work on extended harmony stacking without too many intricate rhythms or complicated vocal percussion.

I Want You Back

By: The Jackson 5
Arranged By: Rob Dietz
SSATBB div + Solo and Vocal Percussion

Ready to step it up? This arrangement is a good challenge for a true intermediate group that’s ready to tackle rhythm, stacked harmony, agile bass, and vocal percussion all at once!

About Rob Dietz

Rob Dietz is a multiple CARA winning producer who has been arranging, performing, and teaching contemporary a cappella music for over twenty years. Rob is best known for his work as an arranger and group coach for NBC’s The Sing-Off. Through his work on the show, Rob has collaborated with some of the top talent in the vocal music world, including Pentatonix, Peter Hollens, and Voiceplay. His arrangements have been showcased on several TV shows, including America’s Got Talent (NBC), To All The Boys: P.S I Still Love You (Netflix), and Pitch Slapped (Lifetime). As a performer he is an award-winning vocal percussionist, and his distinctive sound has been featured on FOX’s Glee and The Late Late Show with James Corden.

Rob has a deep passion for a cappella education, and is a founding co-director of A Cappella Academy (along with Ben Bram and Avi Kaplan). In addition to his work with Academy, Rob is also the director of Legacy: an award-winning auditioned, community youth a cappella group. Rob is the author of A Cappella 101: A Beginner’s Guide to Contemporary A Cappella Singing. Alongside his work in contemporary a cappella music, Rob is also an avid choral composer – his pieces are performed by choirs from all over the world. Learn more at www.robdietzmusic.com. Twitter and Instagram: @rdietz55.

3 Selections To Get Your Choir Back Into The School Year

By Danielle Larrick

As we transition into the Back to School season, many of us are shifting our focus and starting to consider repertoire for the upcoming year. 

While the final choices will come down to you, this is a great way to engage your musicians and get their opinion on the repertoire you’re considering for the upcoming year. Back to School season is the perfect opportunity to have your musicians listen, evaluate, and select their top pics from a list of repertoire. This can take place during the first weeks of school, or even in a Back to School newsletter to musicians!

I did just this with my own singers at the end of the school year. Here were some of their top picks!

Selection 1 – “Winter Wolf” 

This haunting piece in 3/4 offers some wonderful teaching moments especially in terms of part indepence and entrances. The ranges cater to adolescent voices. The text is rich and offers great practice in diction. Overall, it’s a great juxtaposition to the traditional winter repertoire. 

Selection 2 – “Storm”

You can’t go wrong with body percussion! I love it and so do my singers. The challenging rhythms and upbeat tempo are a perfect fit for the feel of the piece. 

Selection 3 – “Stars I Shall FInd”

The long phrases of this piece are simply stunning. The text is a beautiful opportunity to work on vowel shape. It offers much room for expression and features some dissonant harmonies that resolve in a stunning way.

For over a decade, Danielle has served as a musician-educator in both urban and suburban settings.  She believes in the value of middle school music as a means of identity, expression, and connection. She focuses on designing practical, innovative, and engaging music curricula for middle school students. Motivated by the ever-changing trends in education, Danielle continues to write, present, and create. She is the author of  “Middle School General Music: A Guide to Navigating the Unknown” (F-flat Books), as well as other resources designed for middle school general music and choir. Along with Jessica Grant, she is the co-founder of The Confident Music Educator. She currently resides in Lancaster, PA with her husband, son, and Boston Terrier. 

Instagram: musicalmiddles

E-mail: musicalmiddles@gmail.com

Website: https://theconfidentmusiceducator.podia.com/

Instagram: theconfidentmusiceducator

How To Make Your Choir Inclusive for Trans, GNC and Queer Singers

by Caite Debevec

I failed my first transgender student.

I was in grad school and had never had a trans singer in my choir before. I was rooted in what I knew regarding voice types. I was sure that my priority would be vocal health above all else and I was determined to give the singer the best choral experience I could.

Did you catch my mistake?

Rather than centering my student in their experience, it was all about me. What could I give them? How could I improve their voice? Did I know warmups and exercises to address all their vocal struggles?

In the years since, I have curated a list of reminders for myself and other choral directors who strive to create safe spaces for transgender (trans), gender non-conforming (GNC), and queer singers.

First and foremost: It’s not about you.

This is something I tell myself before every rehearsal. While I may have the degrees and the knowledge, the tricks and tips, my primary responsibility is to serve my singers in the way they need me. This doesn’t mean I bend over backward to acquiesce their every request, but my goals for singers are secondary to the goals and aspirations they have for themselves. Allow your singer to be the captain of their choral experience.

Our students don’t owe us their story.

Your trans, GNC, and queer singers have no obligation to tell you anything about themselves. Accept the information that they provide willingly, and only ask questions if they create the space for you to do so. If they don’t share, you don’t need to know.

Trans and GNC singers reserve the right to enter a choral classroom without divulging their complete medical history.

Singers determine the quality of their own musical experiences.

Choral directors often focus on vocal health, but our concept of health should encompass a singer’s physical, mental, and social well-being.

You may have a transmasculine person who wants to sing in the tenor section, and they can only hit half the notes. Is there a chance they could hurt their vocal mechanism? Yes. Is forcing them to sit in the alto section – which is often predominantly singers who identify as female – the solution? No.

A singer’s mental and social well-being are just as important. While that trans singer may only be able to sing half of the notes, to them it may be the quality musical experience that they are looking for.

And always remember: Every singer’s quality experience will look different. One transfeminine person may want to sing alto, while another wants to sing bass. I find the best way of handling this is to say, “Feel free to join whichever section you feel most comfortable in, switch sections at any time, and let me know if you’d like some support!” This gives singers the opportunity to ask for guidance, but the freedom to explore their voices by themselves.

Accommodations for one singer often benefit the entire ensemble.

A few accommodations that have secret benefits:

  1. A good portion of my alto section is trans women who are singing the alto part an octave lower than written. Not only does that expand the repertoire I can program, but our intonation is greatly influenced by the bolstered low notes.
  2. Exercises that are specifically designed for trans and GNC voices are great warmups for the entire ensemble.
  3. When one section is learning their notes, have the entire ensemble sing along in octaves. Members who are singing an octave higher or lower than written can learn their notes without feeling like they are exposed. This also builds musicianship skills for the ensemble.

Most importantly: Trans and GNC singers are singers.

For many of my singers, their transness is a major part of their identity, but it isn’t the reason they joined my ensemble. While we make accommodations for our trans, GNC, and queer singers, be aware of “othering” them, or unconsciously setting them apart from your cis/het singers. Remember: We are all singers who want a community that makes music together.

For continued reading regarding transgender, gender non-conforming, and queer choral experiences, I recommend The Singing Teacher’s Guide to Transgender Voices by Liz Jackson Hearns and Brian Kremer, and A Queerly Joyful Noise: Choral Musicking for Social Justice by Jules Balèn.

If you would like further reading on vocal health, HRT, and the trans/GNC singing experience, I recommend One Weird Trick: A Users Guide to Transgender Voice by Liz Jackson Hearns, and Voice and Communication Therapy for the Transgender/Gender Diverse Client by Richard K. Adler, Sandy Hirsch, and Jack Pickering.

Caite Debevec is a conductor, composer and educator living and working in Baltimore City. She is currently the music director for the Baltimore Men’s Chorus, the founding music director of the Baltimore Women’s Chorale, Manager of Early Childhood Education at the Maryland Science Center, and an independent voice instructor working with trans, non-binary, and GNC singers. www.caitedebevec.com IG: @baltimoremenschorus@bmorewomen

My 9+ Favorite Elvis Songs From Each Era

By: Bruce Dierbeck – Social Media Manager

Thanks to the new “Elvis” biopic, the world has caught Elvis Presley fever all over again (not to be confused with his cover of “Fever” from the 1973 Aloha From Hawaii special).

Elvis’ music career can really be broken down by 3 distinct eras. There’s the early music, which launched Elvis — if not all of rock and roll — into the stratosphere. There’s his movie music that first kept, but then hurt, his relevance throughout the 60s. And lastly, there are the live performances that kept arenas packed until Elvis left the building one final time in August of 1977.

These are a few of my favorites from each of the Elvis eras, from the biggest hits to the deepest cuts. And while Elvis never performed encores, as a “thank you, thank you very much” I have a bonus for those who read to the end.

EARLY ELVIS

“Hound Dog”

Best spun on a 45, preferably with your dog of choice nearby.

“All Shook Up”

One of our favorites from Elvis’ early years, but we thought we’d shake it up here with a fast-paced rendition from the Comeback Special.

“Are You Lonesome Tonight”

Such a sad, beautiful song. But have you ever heard the “Laughing Version” where Elvis falls into a laughing fit while performing this song live?

ELVIS MOVIES

“Love Me Tender”

From Elvis’ first motion picture, a tender love song we still can’t get over.

“Jailhouse Rock”

It would be a crime not to include this one.

“Mine”

A deep cut off the “Speedway” soundtrack, which is one of the seemingly five thousand movies in which Elvis played a race car driver. This was a soundtrack song that was never actually featured in the movie. Could it have been as big as “Love Me Tender” had it come out a decade earlier and featured in the film as opposed to being used as filler? We’ll never know. But it’s a favorite of, well, mine.

ELVIS LIVE!

“Suspicious Minds”

You can see why this was a perennial concert favorite in this sprawling 6-minute live rendition from the summer of 1970. Elvis puts his everything into this performance, leaving both the king and the crowd spent.

“Just Pretend”

A beautiful melancholic number that’s a little bit country, a little bit R&B, and therefore a whole lotta bit the kind of song Elvis loved to deliver during this era.

“American Trilogy”

One of the most iconic moments from the “Aloha From Hawaii” special, it also features a jaw-dropping flute-solo one doesn’t see much in rock concerts not featuring Jethro Tull.

BONUS: ELVIS COVERS

Just as Elvis inspired so many artists over the past half-century, Elvis was heavily inspired by his contemporaries and loved covering their music. Here are 3 Elvis covers that TCB in our eyes.

ELVIS x THE BEATLES: “Get Back / Little Sister

Did you know that not only did Elvis and the Beatles spend an evening jamming in his Hollywood living room one night in the late 60s, but that Elvis also covered a few Beatles tracks during his summer of 1970 Vegas shows? His covers of “Yesterday” and “Something” are beautiful, but it’s his mashup of “Get Back” with his own “Little Sister” that was ahead of its time.

ELVIS x THE BEE GEES: “Words

Yes. You read that right. Elvis covered the Bee Gees. And words can’t truly describe how amazing that is.

ELVIS x NEIL DIAMOND: “Sweet Caroline”

The entire planet knows every word to “Sweet Caroline” but very few know that Elvis covered this would-be Neil Diamond classic during the summer of 1970 in Las Vegas. Our thoughts? So good, so good!

Discover Elvis’ legendary catalog of music at sheetmusicplus.com

Bruce is part of the social media team at Sheet Music Plus and lives in Milwaukee, WI with his wife and two golden retrievers. He’s a lover of all kinds of music from old school rap and classic country to yacht rock and power pop, as long as it has a catchy beat or can turn a creative lyric. He has an unhealthy knowledge of 1970s Elvis and can tell anything from the year a particular jumpsuit was worn to what night a live performance was from.

10 Favorite Broadway Songs Picked by Sheet Music Plus

We are so excited to watch the Tony Awards this weekend! There is nothing like a great Broadway musical number, and there have been so many over the decades. From classical Broadway hits to modern gems, we love to sing, dance, get sucked into YouTube rabbit holes, and get these tunes stuck in our heads. While it is difficult to narrow down just a few of these standout songs, we’ve collected our favorites from our Sheet Music Plus staff. 

It Takes Two

from Into the Woods

A classic from Stephen Sondheim.  

Seasons of Love

from Rent

An oldie, but a goodie that never gets old.

Wheels of a Dream

from Ragtime

A goosebump-inducing duet with Audra McDonald and Brian Stokes Mitchell. 

All That Jazz

from Chicago

One of the best opening numbers ever. Chita Rivera understands the assignment.

You’ll Be Back

from Hamilton

Is it bad to admit that the king is one of our favorite characters?

Circle of Life

from The Lion King

Such a powerful opening number. It’s hard to not get chills.

Tonight

from West Side Story

Sondheim and Bernstein crafted some of the most timeless love songs when they created West Side Story.

Wait for Me

from Hadestown

Who would think that ancient Greece would mix so well with New Orleans and soul music?

Springtime for Hitler

from The Producers

“It was outrageous, offensive, and insulting, and I enjoyed every minute.”

Bring Him Home

from Les Miserables

Colm Wilkinson’s performance of this song is a masterclass.

5 Tips on How To Be a Musician and Succeed Into The Wedding Industry

Becoming a wedding musician can be a rewarding and fun experience to showcase your talent and share your passion for music with others.

It can also be a great way to make extra money or venture into it as a full-time career. But how does one become a successful wedding musician?

Here are some tips to help musicians who want to break into the wedding gig scene.

1. Make Sure Your Sound Is Polished and Professional

Be confident in your abilities, and don’t be afraid to show your personality through your music. Your goal is to connect with the audience and create a memorable experience for them. Ensure your voice is in top shape and have a repertoire of songs that will appeal to a wide range of people. 

Guests will be expecting high-quality music, so make sure your band or solo act is up to par. Have a backup in case of faulty equipment, and make sure your sound is well-balanced.

2. Be Prepared For Anything

Weddings can be unpredictable events, so always be ready for the unexpected. You need to be able to connect with your clients and understand their needs.

You also need to have a great attitude and be professional at all times. If the bride wants to change the song order last minute, be able to go with the flow. If you are not comfortable with the request, politely say no and explain why.

Taking direction and working well under pressure are essential skills for any musician wanting to make it in the wedding industry.

Most importantly, remember that a wedding is not the time to try out new materials. Stick to tried-and-true songs that will please the crowd and your client.

3. Dress Appropriately

You may not think about this, but what you wear can make a big impression on clients. If you’re playing at a formal wedding, dress the part.

Wear a suit or dress that is appropriate for the occasion. On the other hand, if you’re playing at a more relaxed wedding, you can be more casual in your attire.

It would also be good to do a little research on the dress code of the wedding. Ask the couple or the wedding planner what they envision for the day, so you can be sure to look your best.

4. Know What You Should Play In a Wedding Gig

The most important thing is to make sure that the couple is happy with the music selection on their special day. If they have any specific requests, prepare a mix and send it to them in advance for their approval.

It’s important to remember that a wedding is a happy occasion. The music should reflect that, so steer clear of anything too dark or depressing.

Avoid too heavy, rowdy songs or inappropriate ones as that can quickly ruin the mood.

It’s always good to have a setlist of fast and slow songs appropriate for weddings. Include a few classic pieces that everyone knows this way; you can keep the energy up when needed and give people a chance to catch their breath and relax a bit.

5. Market Yourself to Break into the Wedding Gig Scene

You can do a few things to market yourself as a musician for weddings.

  • Create a portfolio of your work. It can be a website, an online profile, or even a physical portfolio. Make sure to showcase your range and include examples of different genres of music that you can play.
  • Get involved in the wedding industry. Attend bridal shows, meet with event planners, and network with other vendors.
  • Promote your services. You can achieve this through word-of-mouth, online advertising, or even print marketing materials.
  • Play for free at a few weddings and social gatherings to get your name out there, and be sure to ask for referrals from satisfied customers.

Browse our wedding sheet music collection to find the right music to make perfect memories!

Great Editing: The Difference between Success & Frustration!

Guest post by Ingrid Jacobson Clarfield and Phyllis Alpert Lehrer, editors of Classics for the Developing Pianist and Study Guides for Preparation, Practice & Performance Books 1-5

Classics for the Developing Pianist and Study Guides for Preparation, Practice & Performance Books 1-5

Our 5 anthologies contain the 100 pieces that pianists should learn to play. In the 5 companion Study Guides for each piece. Problems are IDENTIFIED and problems are SOLVED.                                                             

Continue reading ‘Great Editing: The Difference between Success & Frustration!’

Edition Peters: Piano, Pedagogy, Studies and the Influence of Carl Czerny

Guest post by Christian A. Pohl, Professor of Piano and Piano Methodology, Head of Piano Department, University of Music and Theatre ‘Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy’ Leipzig 

The start of the nineteenth century saw a seismic shift in the world of domestic keyboard playing as the piano rapidly displaced the harpsichord and clavichord as the instrument of choice in homes across Europe. Seizing on this new opportunity, a series of piano instruction methods were swiftly published, followed by methods and studies over subsequent generations that covered the rudiments of piano playing, technique and performance practice. A huge number of these studies are represented in the Edition Peters Piano Catalogue.

Major names in the field of piano pedagogy were quickly established – including Beyer, Burgmüller, Hanon and Clementi – but it was one who followed behind them that arguably defined the shape of piano pedagogy for generations to come. Indeed, even today – nearly 200 years after this educational “meteorite” first struck the German-speaking piano world – the waves of his impact are still being felt. There is no getting around Carl Czerny when it comes to pianistic exercises or didactic approaches to building a virtuoso pianist.

Carl Czerny
Continue reading ‘Edition Peters: Piano, Pedagogy, Studies and the Influence of Carl Czerny’

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