Posts Tagged 'music'



Top 10 Facts About Claude Debussy

Written by: Austin Hennen Vigil

Saint-Germain-en-Laye, Paris

Claude Debussy was a famous French composer that was born on August 22nd, 1862, in Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France. The town is located near Paris and he was the oldest of five children.

He was a prominent musician who was known as the founder of Impressionist music and was one of the most influential/highly regarded composers in the world during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. March 25, 2018 was the 100th anniversary of his death, so in his honor here are 10 facts about the legendary French composer of which you may not have been aware:

Continue reading ‘Top 10 Facts About Claude Debussy’

The Magic of Music: 8 Musical Phenomena Explained

Beethoven said, “Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy.” He was right! Music awakens the senses and makes thoughts and feelings come alive. It unites cultures, countries, and individuals. Music is timeless and borderless. There is a mystery associated with it, though.

Even the great composers of old did not understand why songs get stuck in our head. Most people today do not know why we get chills when listening to music; and more importantly, why on earth do we love listening to sad songs? Scientists have come up with a few theories as to why these phenomena happen. The infographic from TakeLessons below discusses the answers to these questions and more.

 

 

 

 

Forge Your Educational Path to Success as a Music Teacher: Licenses, Degrees and More

Guest post by Audrey Allen, Assistant Content Editor from University of Florida.

Becoming a Licensed Music Teacher

Skilled musicians who want to share their passion for music often find teaching to be a rewarding career path. Some of these musicians offer private lessons in their own studio or teach at a private music school, and may have no formal academic training. You can expand your opportunities for a successful teaching career vastly, however, through formal education.

Continue reading ‘Forge Your Educational Path to Success as a Music Teacher: Licenses, Degrees and More’

The Elder Statesman of the Cello World

Director Ty Kim and Cellist Lynn Harrell

Lynn Harrell – A Cellist’s Life is an extraordinary documentary feature film that chronicles the 60-year journey in music of renowned classical cellist Lynn Harrell who has performed around the world as a soloist with every major symphony orchestra. We learn about Lynn’s devastating childhood when he lost both parents (one to cancer, the other in a fatal car crash) to establishing a career as a virtuoso cellist collaborating with the most legendary musicians in history spanning multiple generations. The film includes fresh interviews with iconic musicians of the day such as the cellist Yo-Yo Ma, violinists Itzhak Perlman and Anne-Sophie Mutter, and Oscar-winning composers John Williams and André Previn. Lynn Harrell, a multiple Grammy-award winner, shares his personal revelations about universal themes such as overcoming tragedy, finding a higher purpose in art, what it means to grow old, and the power of music to change lives. His story will captivate and inspire.

Continue reading ‘The Elder Statesman of the Cello World’

Learn How to Read Sheet Music: Dynamics, Articulations and Tempo

So you may be thinking to yourself, “I know how to read and play notes and rhythms, but how do I make it sound more interesting?” That’s where dynamics, articulations and tempo come in. Dynamics tell you how soft or loud the music should be played; articulations tell you how short, long or strong a note should be played, and tempo tells you how slow or fast to play the music. Most sheet music will have more than just the notes and rhythms; it will have symbols and terms for dynamics, articulations and tempo as well. It is like learning a whole new language. We’ve outlined the basics to help get you started.

Continue reading ‘Learn How to Read Sheet Music: Dynamics, Articulations and Tempo’

Transcribing Your Songs

While most classical and jazz works are written down before they are performed, songs in other genres are often worked out through a series of improvisations in which each instrument develops their own part. Because of this, it can be difficult for the songwriter to go back and write out the song later on. This process is called transcribing; the finished product is called a transcription.

WHY TRANSCRIBE?

Why would songwriters want to write out their own songs once they’re finished? There are many great reasons, including:

  • Memory guide. When you’ve got lots of music memorized and under your fingertips, it’s easy to get mixed up and forget the details of every song. Transcribing gives you a quick reference point if you’re drawing a blank before a gig or recording session.
  • New band members. Does your band personnel change frequently? Are you a solo artist who hires musicians on a per-gig basis? You could waste valuable rehearsal or studio time teaching new players your songs, OR you could have transcriptions in hand for them to read from—better yet, email PDFs ahead of time so they come in prepared and ready to play!
  • Auxiliary instruments. Haven’t you always really imagined that synth patch as a bunch of trumpets? Or the guitar line to be a violin section? Musicians from the classical and jazz worlds are used to reading their parts and would rather not have you teach them by rote while the clock is running. So, if you have a group of trumpet players ready to play that synth part, you need to have their music clearly notated.
  • Pass it around. The best flattery a songwriter can receive is another musician wanting to play their music. Your music will get played more often, in farther locales, and with greater accuracy, if you take the time to transcribe and notate it. Services like Digital Print Publishing provide a forum for musicians around the world to easily share PDF transcriptions of their songs—and earn money doing it!

GETTING STARTED

So, how do you transcribe your songs? There are many helpful resources, both electronic and interpersonal, but the best place to start is with your own ears and a piece of paper. Continue reading ‘Transcribing Your Songs’


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Thought-provoking articles by musicians for musicians, music lovers or those that want to learn more about it!

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