Performance Practice: Interview with musicologist and Bärenreiter editor Clive Brown

Question: You are very well known for your pioneering work in performance practice. The term and all its ramifications are gaining in recognition and application today. Where does performance practice have its origins?

Clive Brown: It’s not a new thing. Already in the early 19th century people were concerned about performing the music of older composers in the style appropriate to it. When the 21-year-old violinist Spohr played in Leipzig in 1804, Friedrich Rochlitz admired ‘his insight into the spirit of different compositions, and his artistry in reproducing each in its own spirit’, which he had not observed to this extent in the playing of other musicians. Rochlitz found this particularly impressive in his quartet playing where he was ‘almost completely another person when he, for example, plays Beethoven (his darling, whom he handles splendidly), or Mozart (his ideal), or Rode (whose grandiosity he knows very well how to assume, without any scratching or scraping, yielding little to him, particularly in fullness of tone), or when he plays Viotti and galant composers: he is a different person, because they are different people.

Around the same time people were concerned that the proper tempos for Haydn and Mozart were being forgotten. In the second decade of the 19th century, Salieri provided Mälzel’s metronome with marks for Haydn’s Die Schöpfung, of which he had directed the premiere, and Gottfried Weber wrote an article about un-authentic tempos in Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte. During the next few decades more “Performance Practice: Interview with musicologist and Bärenreiter editor Clive Brown”

Flip FeedBACK to FeedFORWARD at Piano Lessons (via 88 Piano Keys)

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A podcast has my wheels turning and I’m excited to share it with you! Jennifer Gonzales, from Cult of Pedagogy, held an interview with Joe Hirsch, a fourth grade teacher and author of The Feedback Fix: Dump the Past, Embrace the Future and Lead the Way to Change. Before reading further, you may just want…

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Resources for Conductors from Meredith Music

Meredith Music Publications, an award-winning publisher of percussion performance music and method books, was established in 1979. Their conducting resources provides a wide variety of titles ranging from beginner to professional levels. For conductors interested in improving their skills and exploring their knowledge, these publications provide an excellent resource.

The Interpretive Wind Band Conductor  

By John Knight

The Interpretive Wind Band Conductor will help conductors make the creative leap from simply reading notes to insightful musical interpretation. In addition to a long list of topics on conducting and interpretation, it includes in-depth analysis of six masterworks for band, and provides solutions for conducting irregular and non-metrical problems inherent in contemporary music.

“Thank you for your brilliant interpretive analysis of my ‘La Fiesta Mexicana.’ It is obvious that you have studied the score very closely and know the music even better than I do! Great advice and insights for the conductor to know for the execution and interpretation of my music.”

H. Owen Reed, composer

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Series Spotlight: Teaching Music through Performance

Teaching Music through Performance is a best-selling series of books and CDs that are theoretical, practical, and analytical. Written, researched, and compiled by scholars with a wealth of teaching and conducting experience, this series enables conductors,  educators, and students to move beyond the printed page toward full musical awareness. Sheet Music Plus had the opportunity to learn from the publisher what inspired the creation of the series.

1. When was the Teaching Music through Performance series developed?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first edition of Volume 1 was for band and was released at the Midwest Clinic in 1997. This year, 2017 is the 20th anniversary of the series.  The Teaching Music through Performance series now includes 26 volumes, 16 for band, three for jazz, three for orchestra, and four for choir. In addition, each volume has accompanying CDs.

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Publisher Spotlight: G. Schirmer

If you’re a classically trained musician, you know the G. Schirmer publications.  Even if that name doesn’t immediately ring a bell, you would recognize the iconic yellow cover with the green border and type. That’s because they have been used by teachers and students for decades. So what makes the G. Schirmer editions so timeless? Sheet Music Plus interviewed Rick Walters, Vice President of Classical and Vocal Publications at the Hal Leonard Corporation to find out. more “Publisher Spotlight: G. Schirmer”

Fitness for Musicians

As a musician, you know how important technique and theory are to musical mastery. But in between all of the practicing, auditioning, and gigging, it’s also important to pay attention to your overall health!

Think about it: as a vocalist, can you remember the last time you ran of out breath while singing a long phrase? Pianists, woodwind, and brass players, have you ever felt sore after a long practice session? Here’s where staying fit and healthy comes into play. more “Fitness for Musicians”

Musical Characteristics and Performance Practice of the Classical Period

By Jacy Burroughs

The Classical period of music had its advent in Italian music of the early eighteenth century and extended into the early nineteenth century. Some musicologists mark the end of the Classical period around 1815, at the end of Beethoven’s compositional middle period. However, the Classical period truly overlaps with both the Baroque and Romantic periods. Characteristics of and performance considerations for Classical period music are outlined below.

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A Brief Guide to Baroque Performance Practice

By Jacy Burroughs

The Baroque period is defined as the advent of opera to the death of Bach, which was roughly 1600-1750. Each period of classical music is characterized by its own styles, techniques, and musical characteristics. While most people do not have the option to play on historically accurate instruments, it is still important to work toward historically informed performance by studying the musical style of that time. Several important characteristics of Baroque music are outlined below.

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10 Outstanding Resources for Jazz Musicians

By Zachariah Friesen

Teachers, students, professionals and dreamers, welcome to the jazz reference mecca. This is comprised of some of the great literary resources, DVDs and method books for the aspiring jazz musician. Learn the keys of success from people who have success in the profession. With these must-have resources, you’ll be jamming, gigging and living the jazz life in no time.

1. How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker – To play jazz you must learn how to hear jazz. The great Jerry Coker beautifully explains how to train your ear and what to listen for in jazz music.

How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker
How To Listen To Jazz by Jerry Coker

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