Archive for the 'General' Category

Music Career Options: What’s Right for You?

Guest post by Kate Samano, Content Editor from University of Florida School of Music

After identifying and distinguishing the different types of music degrees, it is important to take a look at the various career options that music degrees can offer. Each type of music degree offers a graduate a different set of skills, so it is important to determine which degrees and careers correspond with each other.

Associate of Arts in Music

Apprentice Instrument Repair

Many holders of an associate’s degree in music begin their careers as an apprentice in instrument repair and restoration. This is an entry level position that typically works with more experienced repair and restoration technicians in an instrument shop. Their typical day-to-day tasks include repairing and refurbishing instruments, ordering parts, and fielding customer questions and phone calls. Once an apprentice has gained experience, they can move up to a full time specialist or open their own repair shop.

Music Venue Manager

An interesting career with an associate’s in music is becoming a music venue manager. This job is responsible for managing a venue or a group of venues. These managers handle the daily operations of the venue. Their daily tasks might include booking music acts, checking music and bar equipment, managing the needs of performers, and scheduling staff members.

Music Promoter

Music promoters work for both music venues and the musicians themselves. Their goal is to promote the artist or venue in order to generate revenue. Their duties include selling concert tickets, recordings, and merchandise. Another big part of their job is to help manage live music events. Having a background in marketing can be a plus in this role.

Bachelor of Arts in Music

Music Therapist

One of the most rewarding career choices for holders of the Bachelor of Arts in Music is a music therapist. A music therapist uses musical exercises to work with a variety of individuals in a rehabilitating setting. These individuals usually work in mental health centers, hospitals, retirement homes, or rehabilitation centers. Their responsibilities usually consist of working in a team to assess a patient’s mental or physical condition and developing a therapeutic treatment plan. Continue reading ‘Music Career Options: What’s Right for You?’

The Excitement of Editing Debussy’s Works: Interview with Bärenreiter Editor Douglas Woodfull-Harris

Douglas Woodfull-Harris has been working at Bärenreiter as an editor for orchestral and chamber music for more than 25 years and has overseen the production of countless editions. In 2018 we will commemorate Claude Debussy’s death 100 years ago. Among the editions which Woodfull-Harris has personally edited are Debussy’s La Mer, Afternoon of a Faun, his Cello Sonata and String Quartet, Images for piano, Syrinx for Flute, and most recently the Rhapsodie Première for Orchestra with Solo Clarinet (coming in December 2017).

Claude Debussy, c. 1908

Douglas Woodfull-Harris

Why Debussy? What made you turn to his works?

Douglas Woodfull-Harris (DWH): From conversations with musicians I knew that the existing editions had problems such as discrepancies between score and parts of orchestral works. Orchestras had their correction lists and made do with what they had but scholarly-critical editions were badly needed. Also, I simply enjoy the music.

The first work by Debussy which you edited was his cello sonata. How did you proceed?

DWH: Of course, I gathered together all relevant sources as I always do. During this process I investigated a private collection in Winterthur (Switzerland) which nobody appears to have looked into, and there I found sketches to the Cello Sonata.

Now, the final note in measure 18 of the 2nd movement is the lowest note on the cello, a C. In the autograph score, the first edition, and all other published editions a “circle” or “zero” appears above the note (*see example below). This circle today is understood to indicate that the note should be played as an open string. I asked myself why an experienced composer like Debussy would mark a note in such a way that can only be played as the open C string. It simply didn’t make sense to me. The marking seemed redundant. But is it possible Debussy meant something else? Continue reading ‘The Excitement of Editing Debussy’s Works: Interview with Bärenreiter Editor Douglas Woodfull-Harris’

Music Degree Options: What’s Right For You?

Guest post by Kate Samano, Content Editor from University of Florida School of Music

For students interested in pursuing a career in music, there can be some confusion about which degree is right for them. Many degrees sound the same but can be very different from each other. It’s important to understand these differences – arts or fine arts, music or music education – before making the decision to pursue a particular path. Continue reading ‘Music Degree Options: What’s Right For You?’

Celebrating 150 Years of Edition Peters Green

Originally posted on www.editionpeters.com.

Hidden behind the iconic green covers of Edition Peters lies a story that is fascinating, complex, at times heartbreakingly tragic, but overwhelmingly inspirational. This year Edition Peters proudly celebrates 150 years of the green cover series and here is a short version of our story.

Continue reading ‘Celebrating 150 Years of Edition Peters Green’

How to Get Testimonials from Your Music Students

Guest blog post by Doug Hanvey, author of Piano Lab Blog

Testimonials and Online Reviews = A “Real Reason to Believe”

In these days of overhyped marketing of nearly every product and service – and yes, that sometimes includes music lessons! – it is more important than ever to communicate why your prospective students should have what marketing experts call a “real reason to believe” in you and your studio.

The best way to communicate a “real reason to believe” is via testimonials from current or former students/parents.

Of course, testimonials now include online Google reviews, Yelp reviews, etc. Testimonials and online reviews are effective because they are based on the actual experience of a student/parent. They are thus more believable to prospective students/parents than anything you personally say about yourself and your teaching. Continue reading ‘How to Get Testimonials from Your Music Students’

The Magic of Music: 8 Musical Phenomena Explained

Beethoven said, “Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy.” He was right! Music awakens the senses and makes thoughts and feelings come alive. It unites cultures, countries, and individuals. Music is timeless and borderless. There is a mystery associated with it, though.

Even the great composers of old did not understand why songs get stuck in our head. Most people today do not know why we get chills when listening to music; and more importantly, why on earth do we love listening to sad songs? Scientists have come up with a few theories as to why these phenomena happen. The infographic from TakeLessons below discusses the answers to these questions and more.

 

 

 

 

Play It Again: A New Piano Book Aimed at Returning Players

Did you used to play the piano? Would you like to play again? Aimed at returning players who have spent some time away from the keyboard, Play It Again: Piano by Melanie Spanswick gives you the confidence to revisit this fulfilling pastime and go beyond what you previously thought you could achieve. This book is designed to get your fingers speeding comfortably across the keys once again.

Continue reading ‘Play It Again: A New Piano Book Aimed at Returning Players’

Frédéric Chopin and the Chopin National Edition

Who is Frédéric Chopin?

Frédéric Chopin (1810-1849) was a Polish French composer and pianist of the Romantic period, who was best known for his solo pieces for piano and his piano concerti. Although he wrote little else but piano works, he ranks as one of music’s greatest tone poets. It was clear that his love for music developed from a very young age. Young Chopin studied piano with Wojciech Zywny and gave his first concert when he was 8, and rather quickly outdistanced his teachers. By the age of 16, he had composed several piano pieces in different styles, and his parents enrolled him in the Warsaw Conservatory of Music.  Chopin only gave 30 public performances in 30 years of concertizing. While seriously ill with tuberculosis, he managed to complete the 24 Preludes, Op.28. He has composed 20 nocturnes, 25 preludes, 17 waltzes, 15 polonaises, 58 mazurkas and 27 etudes.

What is the Chopin National Edition?

Continue reading ‘Frédéric Chopin and the Chopin National Edition’

Forge Your Educational Path to Success as a Music Teacher: Licenses, Degrees and More

Guest post by Audrey Allen, Assistant Content Editor from University of Florida.

Becoming a Licensed Music Teacher

Skilled musicians who want to share their passion for music often find teaching to be a rewarding career path. Some of these musicians offer private lessons in their own studio or teach at a private music school, and may have no formal academic training. You can expand your opportunities for a successful teaching career vastly, however, through formal education.

Continue reading ‘Forge Your Educational Path to Success as a Music Teacher: Licenses, Degrees and More’

Resources for Conductors from Meredith Music

Meredith Music Publications, an award-winning publisher of percussion performance music and method books, was established in 1979. Their conducting resources provides a wide variety of titles ranging from beginner to professional levels. For conductors interested in improving their skills and exploring their knowledge, these publications provide an excellent resource.

The Interpretive Wind Band Conductor  

By John Knight

The Interpretive Wind Band Conductor will help conductors make the creative leap from simply reading notes to insightful musical interpretation. In addition to a long list of topics on conducting and interpretation, it includes in-depth analysis of six masterworks for band, and provides solutions for conducting irregular and non-metrical problems inherent in contemporary music.

“Thank you for your brilliant interpretive analysis of my ‘La Fiesta Mexicana.’ It is obvious that you have studied the score very closely and know the music even better than I do! Great advice and insights for the conductor to know for the execution and interpretation of my music.”

H. Owen Reed, composer

Continue reading ‘Resources for Conductors from Meredith Music’


About Take Note:

Thought-provoking articles by musicians for musicians, music lovers or those that want to learn more about it!

Shop at:

Sheet Music Plus

FREE Newsletter:

Get exclusive discounts and coupons
Sign Up Today →

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 366 other followers

Twitter Updates


%d bloggers like this: