Archive for January, 2013

10 Interesting Facts About Flute

By Brendan Lai-Tong

Flute

When many people think of flutes, they think of a transverse flute, which is typically used in bands and orchestras. The flute has been a part of history for thousands of years and has evolved over that time into the instrument that is often seen today. Here are ten facts you may not have known about the flute:

  1. A musician who plays the flute can be referred to as a flute player, a flautist, a flutist, or, less commonly, a fluter.
  2. There are many different sizes of flutes within the flute family: piccolo, alto, tenor, bass and contrabass flute.
  3. Standard concert flute is Continue reading ’10 Interesting Facts About Flute’

Music in Community – Paul Herrera

By Brendan Lai-Tong

Hi Sheet Music Plus Fans, welcome back to our Music in Community Series. As many of you already know, budgets for school music programs are very tight. As a result, music directors need to find creative ways to raise funds to provide their students with the musical education that they deserve.

When I was in band, the band parents organized several fundraising opportunities in order to raise the funding necessary to support the program. Bake sales, holiday gift wrapping drives, candy and even cheesecake sales were part of our regular yearly schedules. If there was an opportunity to raise funds, our band was on top of it.

If you didn’t already know, Sheet Music Plus has a great way for organizations to raise funds called Fundraising Plus. Organizations will receive a personalized URL to share that directs to our homepage. Any purchases that are made after clicking through this link will accrue 8% cash back. This is a great way to quickly raise funds for your educational endeavors. Find out more here.

Paul Herrera

Paul Herrera

Today, we’re featuring Paul Herrera, director of Continue reading ‘Music in Community – Paul Herrera’

10 Tips for Improving Sight Reading

By Stephie Stewart

How many times have you seen someone sit down and play music you know they’ve never seen before and play it beautifully? Doesn’t it make you wish you could do that too? Well, the good news is that you can, but it might take a little bit of work. The truth is, most people aren’t naturally great sight-readers. They work at it and they practice it. Sight-reading is more often a learned skill than a natural talent.

“All right,” you say, “so how do I learn to sight read?” A good place to start, would be to start working out of sight-reading method books such as the Four Star Sight Reading and Ear Tests series, Improve Your Sight-Reading! Series, and Creative Jazz Sight Reading.

Four Star Sight Reading and Ear Tests

Four Star Sight Reading and Ear Tests

Improve Your Sight-Reading!

Improve Your Sight-Reading!

Creative Jazz Sight Reading

Creative Jazz Sight Reading

That being said, method books aren’t always for everyone, especially if you aren’t starting at the very beginning of the process. Here are a few tips for anyone who wants to improve their sight-reading, regardless of playing level or experience.

1. Just do it!

As cliché as it might sound, the best thing you can do to improve your sight-reading is to practice sight-reading. Make it part of your regular practice schedule. Find some music that is a few levels below your current level, and just play through it. (Big anthologies are great for sight-reading – there’s a ton of music of varying levels in a single book.) Don’t worry about making it perfect – just concentrate on getting through it. Don’t allow yourself the luxury of working out the hard parts. Do start out a little under tempo if playing up to tempo seems too daunting. As you get more comfortable, slowly increase the level of difficulty of the music and the tempo.

2. Look before you leap

Before you actually begin to play, take a minute to look at what’s coming at you. Look at Continue reading ’10 Tips for Improving Sight Reading’

Artist Interview – Mistheria

By Brendan Lai-Tong

Artist Interview – Giuseppe Iampieri (a.k.a Mistheria)

Welcome back to our Artist Interview series! We’re sure that you all can relate to how important it is to be a versatile musician. You never know what will be asked of you when on the job, and it will be to your advantage to be able to understand and play in many different styles of music. As you know, Classical, Jazz, Pop and Rock all have their respective performance practices. Today we are interviewing Giuseppe Iampieri (a.k.a Mistheria), a native of Italy who has had an incredibly diverse career. He has played piano and keytar professionally in many different styles and genres of music and this versatility has led him to have many exciting and varied experiences.  At the age of 6 Mistheria started studying music with Maestro Marco Aurelio Pisegna, a famous accordionist, composer and performer. By age 13 Mistheria was studying at the Music Conservatory “A. Casella” in Italy where he graduated with honors and distinction in 1995.

Continue reading ‘Artist Interview – Mistheria’



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